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20121126
20121126
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tax cuts on consumer spending. as we know with all of this talk of the fiscal cluf tax cuts are set to spike at the beginning of next year. according to the new report allowing middle class tax rates to group, along with allowing the current tax cut to expire would change the gdp. this is all part of the president's effort to extent the burr-era tax cuts for americans making less than $250,000 a year, all while incriesing taxes on the wealthy. it seems some members of the dgdp could be coming around and be ready to go against the grover norquist pledge. more bill press after the break. stay with us. you're about to watch an viewer created ad message for little caesars who proudly salutes united states veterans everywhere. >> clarksville is a small town on the tennesse/kentucky boader and it is a really great place to raise a family. my name is lloyd allard i was a chief officer in the special forces, i was in the army for 23 years. i have made 1400 parachute jumps. well, my experience in the military was varied. i spent a lot of time in iraq, a lot of time in kuwait. i did
norquist's anti-tax pledge. saying they're open to letting revenues rise if democrats do their part in the budget talks. >> when you're $16 trillion in debt, the only pledge we should be making to each other is to avoid becoming greece, and republicans should put revenue on the table. i will violate the pledge, long story short, for the good of the country only if democrats will do entitlement reform. >> a pledge you signed 20 years ago, 18 years ago is for that congress. for instance, if i were in congress in 1941, i would have signed the declaration of war against japan. we're not going to attack japan today. the world has changed, and the economic situation is different. >> so peter king is telling us, mike barnicle, not only is he going soft on taxes, he's going soft on japan. >> i know. >> it's not just peter king on the taxes. it's a big step, don't you think? >> it's a big step. >> grover. yeah, grover's taking a big hit since the election. there's no doubt about it. i think john, you'd verify this. number of republicans, i've talked to a couple of united states senators who
-profile republicans that says he will break the longstanding pledge regarding taxes and says he will do it for the country, but only if democrats are willing to make reforms on entitledment programs, medicare and medicaid and social security. that is big if. good morning, hope your turkey was great. martha: good morning, everybody, i'm martha maccallum. you've got this. congressman peter king and now senator bob corker say they will ignore the decades old pledge that was signed by 241 house members and senators. he says he believes it is a huge game-changer. >> when you're $16 trillion in debt the only pledge we should make to each other is to avoid becoming greece. republicans should put revenue on the table. we're this far in debt. we don't generate enough revenue. capping deductions will help generate revenue. raising tack rates will hurt job creation. bill: this is the heart of the matter. stuart varney, host of "varney & company". morning to you, sir? >> this is a real shift. one of the two sides had some movement in their position on the tax side of the debate. that side is the re
't act, if the president doesn't act, in unison, your taxes are going up come january 1st to help raise revenue to pay down the national debt. stay with me here for a moment because we'll show you exactly, you know, how much your taxes will be rising. but here's the thing. it doesn't have to happen, this predetermined jump in income taxes and the new parlor game on capitol hill is to pick the next republican, follow me here who is willing to break a no tax pledge made to a very powerful lobbyist, in order to cut a deal with the democrats to focus the pain of new taxes on the wealthy. see this picture? see these three guys. here is yet another republican speaking just this morning. >> i'm not obligated on the pledge. i made tennesseans aware i was just elected that the only thing i'm honoring is the oath that i take when i serve when i'm sworn in this january. >> so republican senator bob corker is saying his oath of office trumps any no tax pledge made to washington lobbyist grover nor quist. republican saxby chambliss says he cares more about america and the fiscal mess we're in than h
to leave the agency. with the content congressional negotiations are the sequester and tax cuts to expire at the end of the year, tonight and prime time, focusing on the beginnings of the debt of the debate on the national debt. c-span will go back to august of last year to review some of the debate and is congress is from congress and the white house to run in the passage of the budget control act. the law created the automatic spending cuts to take effect in january along with some expiring tax revisions as part of the so- called fiscal cliff. it airs tonight it it o'clock eastern-- a o'clock here on c-span. >> in january, our first week we were sworn into office, the president ask for an increase in the debt ceiling. i made clear at that time there would be no increase in the debt ceiling without significant cuts in spending and changes to the way we spend the american people's money. shortly after that, i was in new york and gave a speech and outlined i thought the spending cuts should exceed the amount of debt limit increase and there should be no taxes as part of this agreement. whe
a break the no tax pledge. that is a hopeful sign, folks, because a new cnn/orc poll shows more than two thirds of americans believe a trip over that cliff would create major problems, perhaps even a crisis. cnn political editor paul steinhauser is live from washington, d.c. this morning. nice to see you, paul. so the fiscal cliff triggers back-breaking tax hikes and massive spending cuts. you've got more numbers that show what type of budget plan americans actually prefer. >> exactly. one of the big arguments, zoraida, is should it be all spending cuts to get us there or tax increases, as well? brand-new numbers just out from cnn/orc. only about one in three say whatever deal should be struck should be just spending cuts. but almost seven in ten, two thirds of americans say the plan should include spending cuts and tax increases. our poll indicates americans are not so optimistic a deal will get done and if it doesn't get done, who gets the blame? look at this right here, about 45% say republicans in congress will be blamed if there is no deal and the country falls off the fiscal cliff.
. with level evidence of progress in striking a deal to avoid " the fiscal cliff. >> the series a tax increases and spending cuts set to go into effect next year would dramatically alter the economy. but the the joins reports. >> we must get an agreement. --athena jones.. >> this is not a done deal or a certainty if congress does nothing which they're pretty good about these days. we will go over the fiscal cliff. >> staffers have a working behind the scenes to find common ground to avoid cuts that should be concerning for everyone. >> they should be worried if we have a defense job or if we are dependent on others of the federal budget. the regulation of our food safety, and our borders being secure. or fbi. >> the sticking point is what to do about taxes. the democrats want to raise taxes for the wealthy and republicans to not. the anti-tax crusader had gotten a majority of the " law makers to pledge not to support any effort to raise taxes. >> i'm willing to recorgenerate revenue. where is below but i will not raise tax rates to do it i will cap deductions, and violates the pledge, long stor
washington gridlock. no, it's worse -- look, our taxes are about to go up. not the taxes on our dividends though, right? that's a big part of our retirement. oh, no, it's dividends, too. the rate on our dividends would more than double. but we depend on our dividends to help pay our bills. we worked hard to save. well, the president and congress have got to work together to stop this dividend tax hike. before it's too late. >>> in syria ten children in a suburb outside dam afternooningus have become the latest victims in the ongoing violence. now, fighting has ripped this country apart. activists say more than 40,000 people now have been killed since the first pretest 20 months ago against the regime of president bashir al assad. nick payton walsh shows us what happens when bombs fall in, of all places, a playground. >> these disturbing images show what happens after a children's playground is hit, according to activists by a cluster bomb. refugees with nowhere else to hide apparently hit by a single deadly device dropped by a jet. some cluster bombs released smaller explosives to cause m
-up demand. can we tell yet? >> one thing i'm worried about is the fiscal cliff issue, the tax increases and spending cuts that take place january 1 unless congress and the president reach a deal. businesses have been worried about that for months. maybe consumers are start-- maybe it's starting to creep into their thinking as well. we saw a weaker consumer sentiment number last week. that's thing to watch to worry about as we wonder what the holiday season will be like. >> brown: nariman behravesh, is it strange or do things really change? on the one hand, we want people to get out and spend, but on the other hand, we still talk about over-spending and spending money people didn't really have was part of the problem that got us into this state in the first place. so what's-- that sounds like a little bit of a disconnect. where are we on that? >> well, i think neil is right in saying consumer finances are in much better shape right now. so in that sense, the kind of spending we're seeing now is more sustainable. it's healthier in a sense. debt levels are down. people are not taking, say,
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9